From the Press Box: Could we get baseball soon? Here’s hoping

ESPN’s baseball insider Jeff Passan and his Optimism meter, dubbed the “Suck-o-meter” on Golic and Wingo, has wavered back and forth from cautious optimism to baseball doomsday (which he says could lead to three years without baseball) over the past three weeks.

Wednesday was no different, with his morning explanation articulating how MLB and MLBPA (MLB Player’s Association) and the potential of a canceled season along with labor strife could lead to three years of no baseball. 

But as the day lead on, baseball insiders across all networks shared details of a four-hour meeting between MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred and MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark where a return-to-play deal between the sides was more optimistic, but not imminent.

Shortly after this news broke, the MLBPA said the sides weren’t close to a deal. 

So, what gives?

According to Passan, the deal between Manfred and Clark was centered around a 60-game season with players receiving their full prorated salaries (37 percent of their full-season salaries) and another $25 million for postseason play. They would also receive $33 million in forgiveness on the $170 million advance they received in the March agreement when COVID-19 shut down the sports world.

On the field, the playoffs would expand from 10 to 16 teams over the next two seasons and a designated hitter would be added to the National League in both years.

In the past, I have personally been critical of the players for complaining about money, but have also acknowledged that the owners are twisting the agenda to make the players look greedy. 

But, in recent weeks, more news has come to light- including a rumor that several owners are ready to just let this season be canceled.

As negotiations continue, it appears there is at least a “pathway” to a deal hopefully to be reached soon.

The MLBPA is not a fan of the 60-game schedule, and in the past has suggested 89 games. 

The owners, proposed a 72-game scheduled.just last week.

It appears that the length of the season is the only major detail needing hammered out for a return to baseball.

Thursday afternoon, the MLBPA counter-offered Wednesday’s proposal with one of their own inluding a 70-game schedule, shared playoff revenue, designated-hitter league-wide and 

As I have stated in columns past, they need to get it figured out as the advertising money is right there for the taking. Baseball would be the first of the Big 3 (NFL, NBA, MLB) to return if they start play on July 19-20. NHL plans to return on July 10. NBA’s target return date is July 31.

The NFL is still getting some of their details figured out. But it would be foolish to think the NFL, who has had all winter, spring and summer to plan for the 2021 season, doesn’t have a plan for each letter of the alphabet. 

Whether there is an anthem controversy or not, the NFL will dominate the television ratings, advertising dollars, news headlines and water-cooler banter.

ESPN’s baseball insider Jeff Passan and his Optimism meter, dubbed the “Suck-o-meter” on Golic and Wingo, has wavered back and forth from cautious optimism to baseball doomsday (which he says could lead to three years without baseball) over the past three weeks.

Wednesday was no different, with his morning explanation articulating how MLB and MLBPA (MLB Player’s Association) and the potential of a canceled season along with labor strife could lead to three years of no baseball. 

But as the day lead on, baseball insiders across all networks shared details of a four-hour meeting between MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred and MLBPA Executive Director Tony Clark where a return-to-play deal between the sides was more optimistic, but not imminent.

Shortly after this news broke, the MLBPA said the sides weren’t close to a deal. 

So, what gives?

According to Passan, the deal between Manfred and Clark was centered around a 60-game season with players receiving their full prorated salaries (37 percent of their full-season salaries) and another $25 million for postseason play. They would also receive $33 million in forgiveness on the $170 million advance they received in the March agreement when COVID-19 shut down the sports world.

On the field, the playoffs would expand from 10 to 16 teams over the next two seasons and a designated hitter would be added to the National League in both years.

In the past, I have personally been critical of the players for complaining about money, but have also acknowledged that the owners are twisting the agenda to make the players look greedy. 

But, in recent weeks, more news has come to light- including a rumor that several owners are ready to just let this season be canceled.

As negotiations continue, it appears there is at least a “pathway” to a deal hopefully to be reached soon.

The MLBPA is not a fan of the 60-game schedule, and in the past has suggested 89 games. 

The owners, proposed a 72-game scheduled.just last week.

It appears that the length of the season is the only major detail needing hammered out for a return to baseball.

Thursday afternoon, the MLBPA counter-offered Wednesday’s proposal with one of their own inluding a 70-game schedule, shared playoff revenue, designated-hitter league-wide and 

As I have stated in columns past, they need to get it figured out as the advertising money is right there for the taking. Baseball would be the first of the Big 3 (NFL, NBA, MLB) to return if they start play on July 19-20. NHL plans to return on July 10. NBA’s target return date is July 31.

The NFL is still getting some of their details figured out. But it would be foolish to think the NFL, who has had all winter, spring and summer to plan for the 2021 season, doesn’t have a plan for each letter of the alphabet. 

Whether there is an anthem controversy or not, the NFL will dominate the television ratings, advertising dollars, news headlines and water-cooler banter.

John Lee is the editor of The Pampa News and can be reached at pampanewseditor@gmail.com. Follow him on Twitter: @jcl1987.

 

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